Showing posts tagged art.
x

cable-laid baubles

Ask   About    

Anna. UK I enjoy reading lesbian!Caroline Bingley head-canons so please keep sending them to me.

dynamicafrica:

Filmmaker Steve McQueen returns to his fine art beginnings with an exhibition and his first new film since “12 Years A Slave”.

Made using reworked Super-8 footage of a young boy in Grenada shot by Dutch cinematographer Robby Miller. The previously unused footage was made during a trip McQueen made to Grenada in 2001. There, McQueen came across the young man we briefly come to know in the film “Ashes”, the name the of film’s protagonist.

Recognizing a quality in him that translated beautifully onto the screen, McQueen had wanted to cast Ashes in the project he was working on there but was unable to do so. Instead, he asked Miller to take footage of the young man.When McQueen returned to the island in 2009, he learned of Ashes’ murder. Shaken by this, McQueen’s latest short film and exhibition are an intimate ode to the effervescence of youth and the tragic death of a young man that embodied this vivacity so well.

Steve McQueen: Ashes is currently on view at the Thomas Dane Gallery, London until 15th November.

— 15 hours ago with 1030 notes
#steve mcqueen  #art 
Steve McQueen - Deadpan (1997)
Turner Prize-winning artist Steve McQueen—now best known for his feature films, Hunger, Shame, and 12 Years a Slave—put himself in the line of fire in Deadpan (1997), a restaging of Buster Keaton’s falling house gag from Steamboat Bill Jr. McQueen does more than remake the stunt; his presence as a black man transforms the work into a commentary on race relations and the precariousness of the black experience. 

"Damage Control: How Artists Destroy to Create Art"

(Source: adrowningwoman, via velificantes)

— 1 week ago with 3452 notes
#art  #steve mcqueen 

i-love-art:

Ana Teresa Barboza

Suspensión 2
bordado en tela y tejido en hilo 

85 x 60 cm
2013

(via miladyhuntress)

— 1 week ago with 33847 notes
#art  #ana teresa barboza 
"

When Van Gogh was a young man in his early twenties, he was in London studying to be a clergyman. He had no thought of being an artist at all. he sat in his cheap little room writing a letter to his younger brother in Holland, whom he loved very much. He looked out his window at a watery twilight, a thin lamppost, a star, and he said in his letter something like this: “it is so beautiful I must show you how it looks.” And then on his cheap ruled note paper, he made the most beautiful, tender, little drawing of it.

When I read this letter of Van Gogh’s it comforted me very much and seemed to throw a clear light on the whole road of Art. Before, I thought that to produce a work of painting or literature, you scowled and thought long and ponderously and weighed everything solemnly and learned everything that all artists had ever done aforetime, and what their influences and schools were, and you were extremely careful about *design* and *balance* and getting *interesting planes* into your painting, and avoided, with the most astringent severity, showing the faintest *academical* tendency, and were strictly modern. And so on and so on.

But the moment I read Van Gogh’s letter I knew what art was, and the creative impulse. It is a feeling of love and enthusiasm for something, and in a direct, simple, passionate and true way, you try to show this beauty in things to others, by drawing it.

And Van Gogh’s little drawing on the cheap note paper was a work of art because he loved the sky and the frail lamppost against it so seriously that he made the drawing with the most exquisite conscientiousness and care.

"
Brenda UelandIf You Want to Write: A Book about Art, Independence and Spirit (via raggedybearcat)

(Source: nyctaeus, via whatladybird)

— 1 week ago with 21901 notes
#art  #literature 

divalocity:

Backstage Beauty: Akuol De Mabior for Rosie Assoulin SS 2015 RTW.

Photos Credit: Nicole Cohen and Courtney Velasco  

(Source: sketch42blog.com, via black--lamb)

— 3 weeks ago with 7412 notes
#art  #photography 

bejwelled:

Blue- Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Yves Klein

(via rbyrnes)

— 4 weeks ago with 32349 notes
#art 

isqineeha:

Where Were You When The Lights Went Out (2013)
Yemeni Artist SALWA ALERYANI

In this series, Salwa Aleryani collects electricity bills from her family and writes on them different verses from poems that reference light and darkness, literal or metaphorical, seeking to criticize the current blackouts and lack of electricity Yemen is experiencing at a time when they are producing more than sufficient energy resources. From this, she tries to understand how that darkness affects ones emotions and mental state, since one can predict that without electricity an individual is left in a state of active discovery rather than mere a routine. Even in darkness and stillness ones mind is always occupied with thoughts that allows them to reflect and ponder. In addition, she also tries to reflect on the value of those two outlets; electricity and poetry, and how much they shape our perceptions of darkness and guidance, if one is to think of light as guidance. In these two samples, the artist chose verses from Mahmoud Darwish(top and middle) and Wallace Stevens (bottom) .

Click on Images for Translation. 

— 1 month ago with 196 notes
#art  #yemeni art